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Friday, 16 March 2012

Swedish Lesson #8

Hi,
long longed for ... here is my 8th Swedish Lesson. The 8th! I am sorry I was confused in the making, and call it the 7th.

11 comments:

Halinka said...

Hello,Malin:-)
I've enjoyed Your Swedish Lesson Very much.As for me-You should make it more often:-)
I've been not so long in SE.I've come to Sweden from Denmark.
I am originally from Poland,married to a Danish Husband.
I can tell You-we have got the cheese slicer and we use it,as we both love cheese and the Swedish kinds are really delicious,but there is one thing about that useful item: when You slice the more fat and soft cheese,the tool easily gets stack and the slices are thorn.When You use it for hard cheese,it works well:-)
In Poland we have another slicing cheese invention:the special knife,with the holes on its surface and the ending similar to the fish tail.It's very sharp and slices easily all kinds of cheese.
We use both of them:-)
Thanks to Your Lesson,I've learned some new words.Swedish language is not easy,but I like the sound of it.I also like to live here,to get known the very nice and friendly People around and the marvellous countryside,even if Spring seems to be coming so slow and there is still a little snow left.
Warm Hugs-Halinka-

Claire Maunsell said...

Love this so much, Malin! Am eating my ost with my kaffe right now....

Must. Have. Verbs.....

Bet they're tricky!

Heidi Post said...

Haha! Oh I love that I'm the inspiration for the osthyvel! I'm so honored :) And while I'm familiar with those sorts of cheese slicers, it is not the kind I was imagining when you told me it was a Swedish uppfinning. I was picturing this kind. But now I know. Thanks for the lesson, and don't wait so long for the next one!

Shannon Chomanczuk said...

Love it and so did my daughter. She is 2 and now is running around saying kaffe.

Doreen said...

I can't believe it's been almost a whole year since the last lesson! I love hearing about your Swedish stuff! All this talk about cheese (ost) has me heading for the refrigerator right now. I have some hard rolls and some pepper jack cheese in there! Yum, yum!

Rebecca said...

Hurrah! You know I love your Swedish lessons. And that osthyvel is so very familiar to me - they are not uncommon here now, but my grandad (the one who lived in Lund) ALWAYS had one! And now I know why. The bit I find hard (ask your husband if he found this hard when he first learnt Swedish, I would be so interested!) is the first vowel sound in hyvel. It is so different from any vowel sound in English, or any of the languages I have sung in (French, German, Italian, Latin, Spanish). I am not quite sure how to reproduce it correctly - and as you might have guessed, I like to get the pronunciation just right!

Malin de Koning said...

Rebecca, vowels are difficult, I know. I'll look into that for the future, and see if I can find anything useful from the phonetics I once studied a bit of. I realize I should give you good advice on how to pronounce, and helpful hints.

For now what I can come to think of for a Swedish y is:
start of by saying "Leeds". Take the e sound in Leeds, keep saying it but move your lips forward to an open pouting mouth. If you would go further and tense the lips harder it would create a Swedish u.

Great! I think this shall be my next lesson. The Swedish vowels. I'll show you the mouth movements the best I can. Thank you Rebecca :-)

Malin de Koning said...

Sorry, I realize that thing about the U was wrong. I'll try to explain better in my next lesson.

JeannieK said...

You are adorable and I love, love your accent. Here is how you say "thank you" in Serbian, fala. So fala for the video

JeannieK said...

You are adorable and I love, love your accent. Here is how you say "thank you" in Serbian, fala. So fala for the video

Barbara said...

LOVE IT! Now I will not go hungry or thirsty when I come to Sweden someday! I'm with Rebecca and wondering the way you make the vowel sound in the middle. I'm wondering if it is similar to the french U. It sound very close but more difficult for me to form because Swedish uses different consonants around this sound....very beautiful. Is the letter Y a vowel in Swedish?